Category Archives: Sinaloa

Mazatlan

Mazatlan is part tacky tourist town and part bustling Mexican hub. Camping in cities tends to be expensive for us, so we only stayed for the night. This still gave us plenty of time to explore. Our RV park was located in the Zona Dorada, roughly translated it means, lame resort area.

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The old town in Mazatlan is where it’s at. It almost feels like a totally different world from the hotel zone. We wandered aimlessly down cobblestone streets, through markets and the town square. Of course, snacking along the way.

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Gorditas are quickly becoming one of my favourite foods. They are like delicious little Mexican pizza pockets.

From Mazatlan we headed into the mountains and dropped Julia in Tepic. It was then time to get to Sayulita, where we had planned to meet friends for Christmas. You figure out pretty quickly if you can travel with someone, and with Julia it was a breeze. We’ve also found since getting to Mexico that we’ve started running into the same people repeatedly. Hopefully, we’ll run into Julia again soon.

Castaway Camping in mainland Mexico

The wind that had hounded us for the past week on Baja had also whipped the Sea of Cortez into a choppy mess.  So our ferry ride from La Paz across to Topolobampo wasn’t much fun.  It started out well, we joined the truckers in the on board bar for a few Tecates, and the tv’s were playing ‘Smells like the 90s’ video hits. After we left the port and hit the rough water we both spent most of the 6 hour ride lying down in the cinema room concentrating on not barfing.

But, we made it safe and sound and also picked up a new friend. Julia was also on the ferry and, like us, she didn’t have any plans following our 9pm arrival.  So we split a hotel room for the night and then she joined us in the van for a few days as we slowly made our way down the coast.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Our first stop was a deserted trailer park in Celestino where we spent the sunset hours chatting in broken Spanish to the campground host, Teo. Topics of conversation included what kind of fish can be caught here, and how all the Canadians he knows are named Ken.

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We spent a couple of days here with the waves all to ourselves, living off the coconuts that were growing all around us.  OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
The dried up old coconuts are edible, but they’re chewy and the water inside is kind of salty.  The green ones are the best, the water is sweet and the flesh is creamy, but we had to climb the trees to get them.

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When we needed a change from coconuts, we strolled down to the beach and bartered for fresh oysters with the local divers as they returned to the beach with the day’s haul. They sat out there for hours with their tire tubes bobbing in the waves as the snorkelled around prying the shells from the rocks. Fried oyster tacos… delicious. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA  OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

One of the cool things about camping in Mexico is that we always have a pet.  This time it was a cat that followed us everywhere and was really fussy about her oysters. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOur next campsite paradise was in Teacapan.  More coconuts. No fish. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA